Authors I-L

Katz, J. (1996). Anita, Polish vampire, holds forth at the Jewish cafe of the dead. In V. A. Brownworth (Ed.), Night bites: Vampire stories by women (pp. 19-32). Seattle: Seal Press.

Professor Sadowsky, an independent and intelligent woman, is visiting Krakow during the early part of the 20th century. She is there to meet and interview the legendary Anita Lipsky at the fabled Jewish Cafe of the Dead. Anita, alluring with her piercing yellow eyes, pale skin and fangs, is every inch the vampiress and sups on a human heart as they talk. Relating her unfortunate demise during the pogroms and subsequent “unnatural” appetite for human (and hopefully kosher) hearts, Anita nearly snatches Professor Sadowsky’s heart from her chest. Luckily, the waiter has brought a fresh heart that they both devour before going home together.

This story of two lesbians is inextricably interwoven with the strands of Jewish life and culture. Not only does the author mention that Krakow was later invaded by the Nazis, but Anita has first-hand experience with the Polish pogroms. Night Bites is a wonderful collection of vampire stories by women, about women, and this tale in particular gives one food for thought, not only about the lesbian vampire experience, but also about the Jewish lesbian experience as well.

If you’d like to read more on the intersection of Judaism and lesbianism, try:

Moore, T. (1995). Lesbiot: Israeli lesbians talk about sexuality, feminism, Judaism and their lives = [Lesbiyot]. London: Cassell.

Tulchinsky, K. X. (1998). Friday the rabbi wore lace: Jewish lesbian erotica. San Francisco: Cleis Press.

If you are interested in more Jewish tales of the supernatural, try:

Schwartz, H. (1988). Lilith’s cave: Jewish tales of the supernatural. New York: Oxford University Press.

Wartell, M. (1996). Blood of our children. Westminster, CO: Web Pub.

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Kelly, D.W. (2007). Suck ass. Closet monsters: Zombied out and tales of gothrotica. Herndon, VA: STARbooks Press.


Proc is a gay vampire in prison.  While having rough, albeit somewhat consensual, sex with his cell-mate, Wilky, he reminisces about his sexual escapades with other men.  He is a lover of strong, hairy men, known as “bears” in gay parlance, but if the gay men near him prove to be less hirsute and virile, he will seek out the same qualities in heterosexual men.  Gay men may be his willing partners, but he can, and does, use his hypnotic gaze to coerce heterosexual men into submitting to his sexual desires.  At the story’s conclusion, he has sated his lusts with Wilky and decided to keep him as his companion. Suck Ass is one story in Daniel W. Kelly’s collection of erotic tales about gay creatures of the dark, from vampires to werewolves to zombies.

Told from the perspective of Proc—a vampire in every sense of the word, draining his victims emotionally and physically, as well as of blood—he is not a sympathetic character.  Only the negative aspects of vampirism, such as manipulation, coercion, and callous seduction, are present.  Daniel W. Kelly’s writing is not for the faint of heart.  His stories often lean toward the grotesque, and are very graphic, and pornographic, in nature.  This story is recommended for those who are comfortable with literary pornography and enjoy horror stories.

If you like gay erotica, you might like:

Rowe, M., & Roche, T. S. (1996). Sons of darkness: Tales of men, blood, and immortality. Pittsburgh, Pa: Cleis Press.

Fox, B. (1998). Conjuring the flesh. San Francisco: Leyland Publications.

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Kelner, T. L. P. (2007). How Stella got her grave back. In C. Harris & T. L. P. Kelner (Eds.),  Many bloody returns (pp. 318-355). New York: Ace Books.

Sixty-four years ago, Stella lived in a small backwater town she couldn’t wait to leave. She was turned on her 18th birthday by a vampire named Vilmos. After her apparent death, she was buried and broke out of her grave. Years later Stella and her lover Mark go looking for answers so Stella can get her grave back, and they learn that a Jane Doe was buried there. Stella doesn’t want to move the nameless murder victim, but she feels the pull to find the real story so her plot is her own once more. Retracing Jane Doe’s steps, they are hot on the trail of the serial killer responsible for her death, as well as countless others in unmarked graves. Stella dresses up like a young girl and heads to the truck stop Jane was last seen in, and is drugged and accosted by the cook there. After a bit of a tussle, she alters the killer’s memory so he’ll confess properly and then anonymously alerts the police who finally nab him. The police find Jane Doe’s real identity and she rests in her own grave at last.

Stella and Mark are a very considerate sort of vampire, feeding carefully from humans that they leave alive. Though they are strong and feed off of blood, they are not predators, which makes them quite likable. Part touching romance, part mystery story, this story is dynamic and fast-paced.

For more sleuthing tales, try:

Hunt, L. (2008). The vampire of New York. New York: Signet.

James, D. (2004). Decorated to death. New York: Kensington Books.

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Lannes, R. (1997). Melancholia. In S. Jones (Ed.),  The mammoth book of Dracula: Vampire tales for the new millennium (pp. 62-72). New York: Carroll & Graf.

Dracula is writing his last will and testament. It is biographical in nature and starts off when he meets a homeless prostitute named Ashley while he is working at a homeless shelter. He takes her in while she’s pregnant, and after she gives up the baby, she stays and they begin a relationship. All is not well between them and they enter into couples therapy with Dr. Alex Bloward. Years of therapy turn Dracula into a neurotic mess, and turning Ashley merely makes it worse. Determined to kill himself, he informs his therapist, drains said therapist for his last meal and waits to die.

Though this version of Dracula needs to feed upon humans, he is a bit better intentioned than in Stoker’s novel. The author shows what modernity and civilization do to Dracula: they render him impotent and cripple his naturally predatory nature. The endless cycle of therapy and introspection turn Dracula into a total wreck, and may be the author’s not-so-subtle jab at the ridiculousness of couples that engage in perpetual therapy.

If you’re interested in psychotherapy for Suckers, try:

Gryphon, T. (2007). Key to conflict. New York: Berkley Pub Group.

Hilburn, L. (2007). The vampire shrink. [St. Charles, IL]: Medallion Press.

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Lee, T. (2004). Blood red. In M. H. Greenberg & C. Waugh (Eds.),  Vamps: An anthology of female vampire stories (pp. 308-321). New York: BP Books.

Bianca is the young daughter of the first Queen, with black hair, red lips, and skin as white as snow. The King’s first Queen had disliked the sun and mirrors, and was considered unlucky, so none mourned her passing in childbirth. The second Queen, the Witch Queen, cannot see Bianca in her mirror, a bad sign. Bianca will not wear a cross, nor look in any mirrors, nor will she take communion, and when she begins her menses, a wasting sickness–like the one during her mother’s reign–falls over the land once more. The Witch Queen sends a huntsman to kill Bianca, but she glamours him and drains him dry. Bianca wakes seven stunted dwarf trees and stays in the forest. Disguising herself as an old witch woman, the Witch Queen gives Bianca an apple embedded with a piece of the Eucharist and she sleeps for many years until a handsome Prince awakens her and she is resurrected into a healthy, true child.

Blood Red re-conceptualizes Snow White as a vampire tale that is also a Christian allegory. Bianca and her mother are both vampires, evil beings that shun mirrors. They are invisible in the eyes of God, represented by the mirror of the Witch Queen. The Prince that awakens Bianca is Jesus Christ. He has a golden glow about him as he rides in on a white horse bearing a shield with a lion and a lamb, and he transforms her into a dove before sending her back to be a child in the eyes of God, who now can “see” her. This is an interesting, albeit a religiously heavy-handed, retelling of Snow White suitable for adults and older teens.

If you want vampires and fairy tales, try:

Valentino, S. (2004). Nightmares & fairy tales: Once upon a time. San Jose, CA: Slave Labor Graphics.

Autrey, J. C. (2004). What big teeth you have: A vampire tale. New York: iUniverse.

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Leitich Smith, C. (2008). Haunted love. In P. C. Cast & L. Wilson (Eds.),  Immortal: Love stories with bite (pp. 1-26). United States: BenBella Books [Borders Exclusive].

Spirit, Texas is a small, dull town, where most businesses are boarded up and all the young people leave for college or jobs elsewhere. Cody is reopening the Old Love, a movie theater, with funds from selling property he inherited from his deceased uncle. What no one yet realizes is that he’s a vampire, though Cody is already trying to figure out how to plan ahead for his agelessness. He hires a sweet and sunny local girl, Ginny, to help with concessions, but spooky things start to happen. Could it be the ghost of Sonia, a girl who was mysteriously killed a long time ago? In fact it is Sonia, and her ghostly antics are her way of trying to protect Cody from Ginny who turns out to be not only a very malevolent vampire, but also Sonia’s murderer. With some help from a local boy named Ben, they kill the crazed and dangerous Ginny and wipe out her evil family. In the aftermath, Cody and Sonia begin to fall in love.

This isn’t your typical teen vampire novel, and no one is as them seem. With a series of plot twists and a touching ending, Haunted Love is a sweet teen love story and a very compelling read.

If you want a dash of the ghostly along with your fangs, try:

Hahn, M. D. (1995). Look for me by moonlight. New York: Clarion Books.

Marrone, A. (2007). Uninvited. New York: Simon Pulse.

Katz, J. (1996). Anita, Polish vampire, holds forth at the Jewish cafe of the dead. In V. A. Brownworth (Ed.), Night bites: Vampire stories by women (pp. 19-32). Seattle: Seal Press.Kelly, D.W. (2007). Suck ass. Closet monsters: Zombied out and tales of gothrotica (pp. 41-58). Herndon, VA: STARbooks Press.Kelner, T. L. P. (2007). How Stella got her grave back. In C. Harris & T. L. P. Kelner (Eds.),  Many bloody returns (pp. 318-355). New York: Ace Books.Lannes, R. (1997). Melancholia. In S. Jones (Ed.),  The mammoth book of Dracula: Vampire tales for the new millennium (pp. 62-72). New York: Carroll & Graf.

Leasure, L. A. (2006). Transubstantiation. In B. de Moss (Ed.),  Blood sisters: Lesbian vampire tales (pp. 146-162). Los Angeles: Alyson.

Lee, T. (2004). Blood red. In M. H. Greenberg & C. Waugh (Eds.),  Vamps: An anthology of female vampire stories (pp. 308-321). New York: BP Books.

Leitich Smith, C. (2008). Haunted love. In P. C. Cast & L. Wilson (Eds.),  Immortal: Love stories with bite (pp. 1-26). United States: BenBella Books [Borders Exclusive].

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